Tag Archives: Distribution

Making New Music Distribution Models Work

In this clip Interscope Records head Jimmy Iovine talks about what a new business model for the music industry would look like from a business and consumer perspective, and what changes need to happen if record companies are to successfully make the switch.

http://youtu.be/HrOorem5q6k

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Jeffrey Brabec On Types of Publishing Deals

In this clip Jeffrey Brabec, Vice President of Business Affairs for the Chrysalis Music Group, talks about two types of publishing deals. The first is the writer deal. A writer agrees to deliver a certain number of songs. The second is the hip-hop and rock deal. Brabec points out that hip-hop and rock deals are structured the same. However, hip-hop and rock deals do have a significant distinction. Rock and roll has very little sampling, while hip-hop has a lot. Brabec explains that samples must be cleared prior to the payment of an advance. Also, hip-hop deals are more expensive.


Music Promotions, Marketing – Using Social Media Skills To Get Video Views

Here are a few tips on music marketing, promoting using social media skills like keyword threading and other geo-tagged methods.


Music Business – Creative Distribution – Moving CD’s And Making Money


Musician’s Social Media Pyramid (2010)


How To Get Your Money Seminar – Pt. 4

How To Get Your Money Seminar – Pt. 4

Filmed Tuesday, August 16th.

Presented By:

Jeff Price — CEO/Founder TuneCore

Jamie Purpora — President of TuneCore Publishing Administration

Co-Presented by “Limelight, the simplest way to clear any cover song.”


How To Get Your Money Seminar – Pt. 3

How To Get Your Money Seminar – Pt. 3

Filmed Tuesday, August 16th.

Presented By:

Jeff Price — CEO/Founder TuneCore

Jamie Purpora — President of TuneCore Publishing Administration

Co-Presented by “Limelight, the simplest way to clear any cover song.”


Pink Floyd manager Peter Jenner on digital music formats by Ian Delaney

Are you happy with the music on your mobile? Music industry legend Jenner thinks we’ve got a long way to go yet.

The dark side of digital music

GLOBAL – A true industry veteran, Peter Jenner has managed Pink Floyd, T-Rex, Ian Dury, The Clash and Eddi Reader among others. He’s now head of the International Music Managers’ Forum.

Before you read on, take a look at this video where Peter talks about the state of digital music. We’ll wait. (Sorry, it’s not in a embeddable format).

Format disk

Like me, Peter started off in the world of 7-inch and 12-inch vinyl. He recalls cassettes coming along in the 1970s as a new format, with only partial success. And then CDs, which persuaded many of us to re-buy our record collections.

Then along came the age of digital, and many in the music industry hoped that we’d re-buy all our music again in this new format. But, of course, the public weren’t entirely convinced.

At least with CDs, you got a physical product and the promise of greater durability and improved sound quality. Buying those same recordings as a digital file seemed to many like buying thin air.

And once people realised that they could create and share their own digital versions. Well, it seemed the likelihood of making money from digital music was zero.

No way out

That was more than ten years ago. And digital music is still a conundrum for the music industry today. Record labels still want to charge a similar amount of money for digital recordings that we paid for physical products. And certainly, artists deserve to be able to earn a living from their work. Yet paying for something entirely immaterial is a hard pill to swallow for many consumers.

“Digital copyright is an oxymoron” says Peter, because digital isall about copying files. Artists and labels should forget about the idea of policing the Internet and punishing fans who download their music without paying for it, he believes.

So what’s the solution? Peter thinks that services likeSpotify and, we’d like to suggest, our own Mix Radio, are a step in the right direction. The music is properly licensed and artists get paid, albeit at radio-play rates.

Shifting the mix

Perhaps the ‘mix’ isn’t quite right yet, though. Just recently, US rock duo The Black Keys said they weren’t going to make their latest album available on streaming services – because the revenue share for artists was so low.

So what’s the next step after streaming music services? Would you pay more for such services, or should artists seek out alternative ways to make money from their work?

Here’s a second video, in which Michael Masnick of the Techdirt blog describes the many ways in which industrial rock project Nine Inch Nails sought to make money after they split from their record label in 2007.

SOURCE:
Pink Floyd manager Peter Jenner on digital music formats


Mechanical Royalty Calculator

Mechanical Royalty Calculator by Harry Fox Agency


For Physical Recordings & Permanent Digital Downloads:

The current statutory mechanical royalty rate for physical recordings (such as CDs) and permanent digital downloads is 9.1¢ for recordings of a song 5 minutes or less, and 1.75¢ per minute or fraction thereof for those over 5 minutes. This is then multiplied by the number of recordings you wish to make. For more information about the statutory mechanical royalty rate, click here.

You can use the calculator below to determine the mechanical royalties due per song for physical recordings and permanent digital downloads for a certain number of recordings. Please note that there is a minimum number of licenses that must be obtained through HFA’s Songfile, and there is also an additional processing fee that is dependent upon the number of songs you are licensing in a single transaction. For more information on Songfile licensing, click here.

You can calculate your royalties here.


How To Get Your Money Seminar – Pt. 2

How To Get Your Money Seminar – Pt. 2

Filmed Tuesday, August 16th.

Presented By:

Jeff Price — CEO/Founder TuneCore

Jamie Purpora — President of TuneCore Publishing Administration

Co-Presented by “Limelight, the simplest way to clear any cover song.”


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